What is agent based modeling?

NetLogo: YouTube URL: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AJXFiO-ULv0

What is agent based modeling?  YouTube URL: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2XvbuEugkIA


After reading and reviewing all of the materials, especially the SENSE4US document provided, what are your thoughts? 

Please incorporate the answers to the following questions in your paper. The paper should be 1.5 to 2 pages, single spaced, please use APA formatting.  

  • Is this a tool that would be difficult or easy to use? (SENSE4US)
  • What do the following terms mean within the context of policy modeling?
  1. Simplicity
  2. Generality
  3. Validity
  4. Formality
  • How are all these terms related?

Please read Chapter 4 – Policy Making and Modelling in a Complex World Wander Jager and Bruce Edmonds

Required Resources Janssen, M., Wimmer, M. A., & Deljoo, A. (Eds.). (2015). Policy practice and digital science: Integrating complex systems, social simulation and public administration in policy research (Vol. 10). Springer. (Included through library subscription)

Project  co‐funded by  the  European Union under  the  Seventh  Framework Programme © Copyright 2015 Stockholm University, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences  (DSV) 

Policy Modelling and Simulation Tool  

A  Simulation  Tool  for  Assessment  of  Societal  Effects  of  a  Proposed Government Policy 

Project acronym: SENSE4US Project full title: Data Insights for Policy Makers and Citizens

Grant agreement no.: 611242 Responsible:  Stockholm University – eGovLab Contributors:  Aron Larsson, Osama Ibrahim

Document Reference:  D6.2 Dissemination Level:  PU

Version:  Final Date: 30/06/2015

D6.2 Policy Modelling and Simulation Tool  

2 | P a g e    

© Copyright 2015, Stockholm University, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences (DSV) 

History 

Version  Date  Modification reason  Modified by 

0.1  2015‐05‐15  First draft  Aron Larsson, Osama  Ibrahim 

0.2  2015‐06‐01  Second Draft  Aron Larsson, Osama  Ibrahim 

0.3  2015‐06‐20  Quality check  Steve  Taylor,  Somya  Joshi 

0.4  2015‐07‐01  Final Draft  Aron Larsson, Osama  Ibrahim 

D6.2 Policy Modelling and Simulation Tool  

3 | P a g e    

© Copyright 2015, Stockholm University, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences (DSV) 

Table of Contents 

History ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 2 

Table of Contents ………………………………………………………………………………………………… 3  List of Figures ……………………………………………………………………………………………………… 4  List of tables ………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 5  List of Abbreviations ……………………………………………………………………………………………. 6  Executive Summary …………………………………………………………………………………………….. 7 

Task …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 7 

Design Objectives …………………………………………………………………………………………………. 7 

Introduction ………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 8 

1  Model Description ………………………………………………………………………………………. 11  1.1  Actors …………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 11 

1.2  Variables …………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 11 

Independent variables (sources of change) ……………………………………………………………. 12 

Dependent variables (impacts of change) ………………………………………………………………. 13 

1.3  Change transmission channels ………………………………………………………………………. 14 

2  Fundamental simulation concepts …………………………………………………………………. 16  2.1  State of the system ………………………………………………………………………………………. 16 

2.2  Scenarios of Change …………………………………………………………………………………….. 16 

2.3  Goal feasibility and compatibility …………………………………………………………………… 17 

2.4  Tactics and Game theoretic analysis ………………………………………………………………. 17 

3  Simulation Process ……………………………………………………………………………………… 19  3.1  Generating Scenarios ……………………………………………………………………………………. 19 

3.2  Graph change analysis ………………………………………………………………………………….. 19 

3.3  Data, forecasting and predictive validation …………………………………………………….. 20 

4  Policy Analysis Model building Process …………………………………………………………… 22 

5  Conclusion …………………………………………………………………………………………………. 33  Enhancements and Future work …………………………………………………………………………… 33 

6  References ………………………………………………………………………………………………… 35  APPENDIX I – Computation Algorithm …………………………………………………………………… 36  APPENDIX II – TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS ……………………………………………………………. 38  APPENDIX III – Policy use cases ……………………………………………………………………………. 40     

D6.2 Policy Modelling and Simulation Tool  

4 | P a g e    

© Copyright 2015, Stockholm University, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences (DSV) 

List of Figures 

Figure 1 : Change transmission channels …………………………………………………………………. 15  Figure 2 : single full channel example ……………………………………………………………………… 19  Figure 3 : multiple full channels example ………………………………………………………………… 20  Figure 4 : multiple half channels example ……………………………………………………………….. 20  Figure 5 : User interface for defining a new policy problem ………………………………………… 22  Figure 6 : User interface for defining scope of the policy model …………………………………… 23  Figure 7 : Example for a basic search query using the policy problem title …………………….. 24  Figure 8 : User interface for selecting areas of policy impacts ……………………………………… 24  Figure 9 : Import concepts to the causal map graphing canvas ……………………………………. 28  Figure 10 : User interface for defining actors’ powers and goals ………………………………….. 29  Figure 11 : User interface for defining measures and mapping time series to them ………… 29  Figure 12 : Edit node and link properties …………………………………………………………………. 30  Figure 13 : User interface for defining a scenario of changes and the scenario simulation as  viewed on the causal mapping canvas ……………………………………………………………………. 30  Figure 14 : Causal mapping model example …………………………………………………………….. 31  Figure 15 : Causal map of the PPE use case ……………………………………………………………… 43   

D6.2 Policy Modelling and Simulation Tool  

5 | P a g e    

© Copyright 2015, Stockholm University, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences (DSV) 

List of tables 

Table 1 : Simulator icons for actors ………………………………………………………………………… 11  Table 2 : Simulator icons for policy instruments – controllable sources of change …………… 12  Table 3 : Simulator icons for uncontrollable sources of change ……………………………………. 13  Table 4 : Simulator icons for policy impacts ……………………………………………………………… 13  Table 5 : Keywords for actors ………………………………………………………………………………… 25  Table 6 : Keywords for sources of change ………………………………………………………………… 25  Table 7 : Coded categories of model elements ………………………………………………………….. 26  Table 8 : Examples for the categorised search results ………………………………………………… 26   

D6.2 Policy Modelling and Simulation Tool  

6 | P a g e    

© Copyright 2015, Stockholm University, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences (DSV) 

List of Abbreviations 

<Abbreviation>     <Explanation> 

API        Application Program Interface 

DSS        Decision Support System 

GUI        Graphical User Interface 

EC        European Commission 

IA        Impact Assessment 

ICT        Information and Communication Technology 

MCDA        Multi‐Criteria Decision Analysis 

Sense4us      Data insights for policy makers and citizens (this project) 

URL        Uniform Resource Locator (web address) 

WP        Work Package 

D6.2 Policy Modelling and Simulation Tool  

7 | P a g e    

© Copyright 2015, Stockholm University, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences (DSV) 

Executive Summary 

The deliverable (D6.2) presents a prototype for a policy‐oriented modelling and simulation tool  that allows users, through a web‐based, user‐friendly interface, to build a systems model of a  public policy problem situation using a graphical representation of the involved actors, the key  variables, control flows and causal dependencies. A quantitative dynamic simulation model of  the structured problem is used to simulate the system behaviour and responses to changing  external  factors  and policy  interventions over  time. The  tool  supports  the design of policy  options and  integrated  impact assessment  in  terms of  social, economic and environmental  impacts. 

The proposed modelling and simulation approach aims to provide: (i) better understanding and  transparency  by  clarifying  and  sharing  the modelling  assumptions;  (ii)  an  evidence‐based  policymaking by bringing facts and abstractions from scientific and experts’ knowledge into the  modelling process; and (iii) incorporation of the newest management technologies into public  decision‐making  processes,  including:  cognitive  strategic  thinking,  scenario  planning  and  participation.  

Task 

The design of an ICT tool for policy makers from the different EU policymaking levels that assists  public decision‐making processes through participatory modelling of a public policy problem,  simulating  and  visualising  the  consequences  of  possible  future  scenarios  and  the  societal  impacts of alternative policy (decision) options. 

Design Objectives 

1‐ User‐created policy scenarios: Models and simulations are often perceived as black boxes,  unintelligible  to  the users. Allowing users  to build  “own” models  for  the policy problem  to  ensure that policy decisions are based on deep understanding and transparency.   2‐  Integrated,  customizable  and  reusable  models:  Defining  proper  modelling  standards,  procedures  and methodologies  to  allow model  interoperability  to  create more  complex or  wider perspective models using existing components or models (blocks) and to ensure  long‐ term thinking by incorporating time aspect into the simulation model.  3‐ Engagement of decision‐makers and stakeholders (even without domain expert skills) in a  participatory modelling process.  4‐  Easy  access  to  information  and  knowledge  creation  in  order  to  reduce  uncertainty:  integration to other work packages to support problem structuring using inputs from WP4 and  WP5. It is of interest to see how the information obtained from open data sources and analysis  of political discussions on  social media and blogs  (all available within  the Sense4us  toolkit)  contribute to increased problem understanding.  5‐ Model  validation:  in  order  to  ensure  the  reliability  of  the model  and,  consequently,  of  policies. A model is valid if it is built using the most relevant components and sub‐models and  is able to reproduce historical behaviour.   6‐  Interactive  simulation:  the use of animations and visualization  techniques  to display  the  model operational behaviour graphically as the model runs over time.    7‐  Output  and  feedback  analysis:  learning  from  output  analysis,  being  able  to  provide  a  feedback  on  the  simulation  process  or  on  the  initial  modelling  assumptions  and  thus  synthesizing  new  knowledge  on  the  system, when  ultimately,  a  satisfying  result  has  been  achieved or when a complete understanding of the system has been gained.   

D6.2 Policy Modelling and Simulation Tool  

8 | P a g e    

© Copyright 2015, Stockholm University, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences (DSV) 

Introduction 

Much has been written about the complexity of public policy decision‐making problems. Those  responsible for creating,  implementing and enforcing policies are required to make decision  about  ill‐defined  problems  occurring  in  a  rapidly  changing  and  complex  environments  characterised by uncertainty and conflicting strategic  interests among  the multiple  involved  parties [1] [2]. 

“Policy Modelling and ICT‐enabled Governance”, has emerged as an interdisciplinary umbrella  term  for a number of research  fields,  technologies and applications with a common goal of  improving public decision‐making in the age of complexity and has recently gathered significant  attention  by  governments,  researchers  and  practitioners.  It  brings  together  two  separate  worlds:  the mathematical and  complexity  sciences background of policy modelling and  the  sustainability, service provision, participation and open data aspects of governance [3]. 

The ability to detect problems and emergencies, identify risks and reduce uncertainties on the  possible  impacts of policies are among  the key challenges  facing  the policymaking process.  Simulation and visualization techniques can help policy makers to anticipate unexpected policy  outcomes. The focus of this study is the prescriptive policy analysis, the impact assessment (IA)  carried out at early stages of policy development. This study  is done as part of the decision  support framework for policy formulation1 described in D6.1.  

In order  to  conduct  a  robust  and  relevant  IA  that  implements  the principle  of  sustainable  development, it is required to determine the social, economic, environmental, organizational,  legal and financial implications of a new policy [4]. In addition, there are certain key aspects  which should be present in order to define the scope of the policy analysis, including: 

(i) Objective(s) of the policy analysis,   (ii) Space or Geographical area: (global, regional, national, sub‐national and local),   (iii) Time (short, medium and long‐term),  (iv) Types and sectors of the related governmental activities,   (v) Power (participation of actors), and   (vi) Engagement of stakeholders. 

The  impact  assessment  of  policy  proposals  remains  a  challenge,  since  the  effects  of  the  alternative policy options are delayed in time and the ultimate impact is affected by a multitude  of factors. The following questions have to be dealt with  in a transparent manner and from  early on in the decision‐making processes:  

 What is the main purpose(s) of the policy?    What is the context of the policy (Influencing factors)?    What are the relevant ways of intervention (policy instruments)?    What are the relevant impacts which require further analysis?    Who are relevant stakeholders and target groups which should be consulted?    What  are  appropriate methods  to  assess  the  impacts  and  to  compare  the  policy 

options? 

Before proposing a new  initiative,  the European Commission  (EC) assesses  the need  for EU  action  and  the  potential  economic,  social  and  environmental  impacts  of  alternative  policy 

                                                             1 Policy formulation: standardizing or rating, the proposed policy as a viable, practical, relevant solution  to the identified problem. The development of pertinent and acceptable courses of action dealing with  public problems is an essential part of any policymaking process. 

D6.2 Policy Modelling and Simulation Tool  

9 | P a g e    

© Copyright 2015, Stockholm University, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences (DSV) 

options2.  Planning  of  IAs  is  communicated  to  the  public  via  roadmaps,  consultation  of  stakeholders and public online consultations including annual revisions of the IA guidelines, in  addition, final IA reports are made public3. IAs are prepared for these initiatives expected to  have significant impacts, including: (i) legislative proposals, (ii) non‐legislative initiatives (white  papers,  action  plans,  financial  programmes,  negotiating  guidelines  for  international  agreements) and (iii) implementing and delegated acts. 

As early as the 1960s, Easton (1965) envisioned the ‘Systems approach’ as a framework and  model  to  address  the  central  problem  of  empirical  political  study  [5].  Such  a  framework  assumes that: (i) political interactions in a society constitute a system; (ii) the system must be  seen as surrounded by physical, biological, social, and psychological environments, i.e., political  life forms an open system; (iii) systems must have the capacity to respond to disturbances and  thereby  to  adapt  to  the  conditions under which  they  find  themselves.  In Easton’s  systems  approach, the five tenants of a framework are: ‘Actors’, ‘Variables’ (the inputs, the processes,  the outputs, and the feedback), ‘Unit of analysis’, ‘Level of analysis’ and ‘Scope’ [5]. Introducing  the  Systems  thinking  to  the  policymaking  process  allows  for  both  a  holistic  and  narrow  examination of the public policy problem, the environment, actors and abstract and concrete  components. 

For purposive,  intelligent action, understanding and safety needs, etc., normal people need  representations of their action context (mechanisms of external and internal factors affecting  decisions), including one’s own and other actors’ actions. Such internal representations have  been  called  variously  mental  models,  causal  or  cognitive  maps,  meaning  in  general:  “mechanisms whereby humans are able to generate descriptions of system purpose and form  explanations of system functioning, observed system states, and predictions of future system  states” [6]. 

Causal maps can be developed by individual decision‐makers to model the structural systemic  elements of their situation and show how change  is propagated through the system. “What  causal maps  contribute  is  a  visual, mental  imagery‐based,  “mind’s  eye”  simulation  of  the  system’s behavior for system analysis and social communication” [7].  It  is obvious that such  maps can be useful for analysing, developing and sharing views and understanding among key  actors also for creating some preconditions for intervention. 

Large‐scale causal maps can be used to model complex policy problems, representing what a  government decision‐maker thinks about the drivers, barriers, instruments and consequences  of change achieved by a certain policy proposal. Data for building such maps are acquired from  the decision makers or from other sources including the WP4 Linked Open Data Search tools,  WP5 Social media Analysis tools, and documents such as: previous policy evaluation or impact  assessment reports, related research literature and reports from research institutes and NGOs. 

To deal with the dynamic complexity inherent in social systems and to infer dynamic behaviour,  quantitative simulation is required [8][9]. Therefore, and particularly in those situations where  it is important to understand the interactions among the variables over time, the value added  by  Causal/cognitive  maps  can  be  significantly  increased  if  they  are  complemented  with  simulation modelling. 

Stefano  et  al.  (2014),  addressed  the  challenges  facing  the  model‐based  collaborative  governance  and  the  policy modelling  issues  in  practice.  As  it was  revealed  by  the  results  obtained  in  two  subsequent EU FP7 projects:  the CROSSROAD project and  the CROSSOVER 

                                                             2 http://ec.europa.eu/smart‐regulation/impact/index_en.htm  3 http://ec.europa.eu/smart‐regulation/impact/ia_carried_out/cia_2015_en.htm 

D6.2 Policy Modelling and Simulation Tool  

10 | P a g e    

© Copyright 2015, Stockholm University, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences (DSV) 

project, the authors  inferred that the Systems thinking and System Dynamics approach may  prove  a  useful  dynamic  tool  for  next  generation  policy making,  which  can  be  applied  in  conjunction  with  other modelling  techniques  to  produce  hybrid models  for  public  policy  analyses [10]. 

There  exist  several  software  packages4  for  processing  causal  data,  graphing  and  analysing  causal maps.  In  addition,  there  exist  software  packages5  for  quantitative  system  dynamics  simulations, in a strict sense for system performance analysis and prediction. None of them,  however, is dedicated to Policy analysis and decision support for policymaking. There is a lack  of policy‐oriented modelling and simulation tools, whereas the existing econometric models  are  unable  to  account  for  human  behaviour  and  unexpected  events  and  the  new  social  simulations are fragmented, single‐purposed, suffer from lack of scalability to the macro level  and require high level of technical competency by users.  

The opportunity we have here is to create a policy oriented tool that supports systems‐based  modelling of public policy problem situations and simulation‐based impact assessment.  

In these contexts we believe that the design of a policy‐oriented modelling and simulation  tool, as a main component of the Sense4us Policymaking DSS, should be based on: 

(i) ‘Systems approach’ to the study of public policymaking;   (ii) User‐created policy scenarios;   (iii) Graphical  representation of  complex problem  situations using  causal maps as 

both a knowledge representation technique and Systems analysis tool;   (iv) Scenario Planning and Dynamic simulation modelling 

This allows  for a problem definition  that:  (i)  reflects  the systemic nature of most of central  policy areas, (e.g., Energy, Financial Systems, Innovation/Growth), for which a regulation/policy  needs to be based on a view of the system as a whole; and (ii) provides a visual problem model  that clearly communicates the policy makers’ thoughts and can bring together different policy  actors.  The main  rationale  is  to  support  a  flexible,  informative  and  a more  rational  and  structured policy making process identifying effective policies by gaining insight from analysis  of the system. The argument behind the use of a graphical representation  is simplifying and  summarising the decision maker’s knowledge and  information gathered from various online  sources  about  a  social,  socioeconomic  or  sociotechnical  system  and  visually  simulates  the  system behaviour and responses to interventions over time. Thus, the causal mapping graphical  representation can be used as a contextual framework that highlights knowledge gaps, guides  information  searching  and models  the  search  results  from  various  online  and  other work  packages sources.  

The  current  technical  specifications  of  the  implemented  online  simulation  tool  is  given  in  Appendix  I.  Specifications will  be  updated  as  development  proceeds  and  are  published  at  Google  Docs6  and  the  online  GUI  for  the  tool  is  reached  through  the  URL  http://dev1.egovlab.eu:4001/.  

                                                             4 For example, CMAP3 – Comparative and composite causal mapping (http://www2.uef.fi/fi/cmap3) and  Decision Explorer (http://www.banxia.com/dexplore/index.html).  5 For example, STELLA (http://www.iseesystems.com/).  6 https://docs.google.com/document/d/1fBr‐pcJLioMccZzf3_VGGPyOnpLJg3c12gdfDbMquPo/edit#  

D6.2 Policy Modelling and Simulation Tool  

11 | P a g e    

© Copyright 2015, Stockholm University, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences (DSV) 

1 Model Description 

This section describes our proposed policy‐oriented modelling and simulation approach, based  on the ‘Causal mapping and situation formulation’ method, defined by Acar, W., (1983) as a  stand‐alone method for problem structuring that ties  in with dynamic systems simulation as  well as the statistical concept of causality [11][12]. The approach defines modelling standards  and a procedure for designing  integrated, reusable and customizable models. The proposed  tool allows users to build a systems model of the policy problem situation, which consists of  three main components: Actors, Variables, and Change transmission channels (links).  

The user starts from a check‐list model of the policy problem, created by identifying the main  issues, objectives, key players,  relevant policy  instruments and direct and  indirect  impacts.  These  elements  are  identified  by  categorizing  the  results  of  the  information  searching  processes done by WP4 and WP5. The user then starts the model building process by adding  and  linking  these elements  to a graphical representation.  In  the resulting model, actors are  coupled with their decision variables and sources of change are linked to their consequences.  The  simulation  relies  on  defining  indicators  and measures  for  the  different  variables  and  obtaining accurate and enough data. 

1.1 Actors 

Actors  are  the  governmental bodies  (organizations,  institutions,  committees or  individuals)  involved  in  the decision‐making process whether executive or  legislative.  In addition  to  the  potential  interested  parties  and  stakeholders  including  governmental  administrations,  businesses and citizens target groups. The actors can be classified as: 

 Official actors – including both:   o legislative actors (Parliament committees, political parties) and   o executive actors  (Governmental bodies, departments and  institutions,  chief 

Executive, staff/officials, agencies, bureaucrats and civil servants)]   Unofficial  actors:  [Interest  groups,  political  parties,  citizen  representative  bodies, 

NGOs, industry/trade Unions, think tanks, media].    

   Executive actor icon 

  Legislative actor icon 

  Unofficial actor icon 

Table 1 : Simulator icons for actors 

1.2 Variables 

Variables are  factors or events  idealised as quantitative variables, or quantified using value  scales, so that  it  is meaningful to talk about change  in the form of  increases or decreases  in  their levels. Variables represent abstract or concrete components of the system or the external  environment that structure, constrain, guide, influence and indicate impacts of actions taken  by actors. The scope of the model is defined by the involved actors and the variables of interest.  The system analysis must consider the  involved actors as coupled with either an abstract or  concrete component. This way, the influence of the actor within and upon the system clearly  reveals itself. An actor has control over his decision variables and interests in some outcome  variables. 

D6.2 Policy Modelling and Simulation Tool  

12 | P a g e    

© Copyright 2015, Stockholm University, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences (DSV) 

Independent variables (sources of change) 

Controllable (decision) variables: These variables are under control of one or more of the actors  using  various  policy  instruments.  Scenarios  of  change  in  these  variables  represent  action  alternatives  (policy  options).  These  variables  reflect  the  allocation  of  natural,  human  and  capital  resources,  the  regulatory  role  of  the  government,  regional  and  international  cooperation and are represented in our model by the following categories and sub‐categories  of policy  instruments under which  controllable  variables  are defined.  Table 2  shows  these  categories and the corresponding icons used for the graphing of the model. 

Table 2 : Simulator icons for policy instruments – controllable sources of change 

1. Economic Instruments:   1.1 Financial instruments:  1.1.1 Public expenditure, investment or funding  1.1.2 Public ownership  1.1.3 Subsidies    1.2 Fiscal instruments:  1.2.1 Taxes, Fees and User charges  1.2.2 Incentives  1.2.3 Loans / Loan guarantees   

  1.3 Market instruments:  1.3.1 Property rights  1.3.2 Contracts  1.3.3 Tradable permits / Certificate trading  1.3.4 Insurance         

2. Regulatory Instruments:  2.1 Norms and standards  2.2 Control and enforcement  2.3 Liability    3. Informational Instruments:  3.1 Public information centres  3.2 Sustainability monitoring & reporting  3.3 Public awareness campaigns  3.4 Consumer advice services  3.5 Advertising & Symbolic gestures 

4. Capacity‐building Instruments:  4.1 Scientific research  4.2 Technology and skills  4.3 Training and employment 

  5. Cooperation Instruments:  5.1 Technology transfer  5.2 Voluntary agreements 

D6.2 Policy Modelling and Simulation Tool  

13 | P a g e    

© Copyright 2015, Stockholm University, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences (DSV) 

Uncontrollable variables: These variables are external factors and constraints not under control  of any of  the actors. Scenarios of change  in  these variables  represent  the possible  futures.  Uncontrollable variables are classified in our model under the following categories in Table.3: 

1. Drivers and barriers  The drivers and barriers of change, are either associated to the political  context (e.g., the political ideology and strategic priorities of the  government of the day, the preferences and demands of politicians) or  the economic context (e.g., the availability of resources, the economic  growth, the economic climate, current and future commitments). 

2. External environment’s disturbances and conditions   The system representing the policy problem is surrounded by physical,  biological, social, and psychological environments that the system  needs to adapt to.  

3. Social, demographic and behavioural change  e.g., Population growth, immigration, culture, attitudes and behaviours. 

Table 3 : Simulator icons for uncontrollable sources of change 

Dependent variables (impacts of change) 

Variables representing the consequences of change in the independent variables, are divided  into direct  impacts, associated with the sources of change, and  indirect  impacts, associated  with the direct  impacts. The actors’ goals are defined as quantified targeted changes  in the  impact variables of  the  impact variables,  resulting  in a goal vector defined  for each of  the  involved actors. Table 4 shows the different categories of impact variables as related to one of  the policy areas. 

  Economy 

  Finance 

  Environment 

  Community / Social 

  Energy  Infrastructure  

  Transportation 

  Healthcare 

  Education 

  Technology 

  Judiciary and Law 

  National Security 

Table 4 : Simulator icons for policy impacts 

Following are impact variables examples to clarify each of the defined categories:   Economic impacts: 

D6.2 Policy Modelling and Simulation Tool  

14 | P a g e    

© Copyright 2015, Stockholm University, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences (DSV) 

Industry and manufacturing activity – Investment rates – Retail sales – Building permits  –  New  business  startups  –  Stock  market  indicators  –  Labour  market  indicators  –  Consumer prices (inflation) – Changes in the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) – Income and  wages – Imports and exports – Competition … etc. 

 Financial impacts:  General government expenditure, fixed investment, revenue and output – Government  deficit and debt – Net Social contributions –  Interest  rates – Saving  rates – Taxes on  production and imports – Taxes on income and wealth … etc.  

 Environmental impacts:  Global  and  EU  temperatures  –  Greenhouse  Gases  (GHG)  emissions  –  Air  pollutants  emissions  –  Ecological  footprints  –  Water  pollution  –  Soil  moisture  –  Hazardous  substances in marine organisms – Waste generation and recycling … etc. 

 Community / Social impacts:  Population & Demographics – Living conditions/Quality of life – Poverty – Immigration –  Social inclusion – Pensions – Unemployment – Crime – Social protection … etc. 

 Energy‐related impacts:  Final/Primary  energy  consumption  by  fuel/sector  –  Energy  efficiency  –  Share  of  renewable energy – Electricity production/consumption … etc. 

 Infrastructure and services‐related impacts:  Freshwater – Sanitation facilities – ICT, mobile cellular and Internet – Paved roads and  Road networks – Public  facilities – Economic and  construction  services – Rural areas  development … etc. 

 Transportation‐related impacts:  Traffic – Air transport, passenger transport and mobility – Motor vehicles – Rail  lines,  Freight transport – Price indices for transport … etc. 

 Health‐related impacts:  Health  status  (Infant mortality, HIV/AIDS,  road  traffic  injuries) – Health determinants  (Regular smokers, consumption/availability of healthy nutrition), Health  interventions  (health services,  Vaccination  of  children,  hospital  beds,  health  expenditure,  health  promotion) … etc.   

 Education and training‐related impacts:  Adult  participation  in  lifelong  learning  –  Low  achievers  in  basic  skills  –  Tertiary  educational  attainment – Early  leavers  from education   – Early  childhood education,  Employment  rates  of  recent  graduates  –  Learning  mobility  in  higher  education,  vocational education and training … etc. 

 Science, innovation and technology‐related impacts:  Broadband access – Entrepreneurship –  Industry production –  ICT  investment/added  value – Research and Development (R&D) investment/governmental researchers … etc. 

 Judiciary & Law / Legal impacts:  Efficiency/independence of justice systems – Use of ICT for the judicial systems – Judges  training on EU laws / laws of member states – Simplicity of EU regulatory environment…  etc. 

 Security and defence‐related impacts:  Cyber security and information assurance – Defence acquisition and industrial issues –  Complex defence programmes ‐ Terrorism, security and resilience … etc. 

1.3 Change transmission channels 

Links or  change  transmission  channels are  cause‐effect  relationships  connecting  the model  variables, defined by:  

a) direction, from an upstream variable to a downstream variable;  

D6.2 Policy Modelling and Simulation Tool  

15 | P a g e    

© Copyright 2015, Stockholm University, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences (DSV) 

b) sign (positive  is changes  in the same direction or negative  if changes are  in opposite  directions); 

c) change  transfer  coefficient:  intensity  of  the  causal  relationship  in  terms  of  the  proportionality  ratio  of  change  transfer,  how  much  change  is  transferred  to  the  downstream variable in case of 1% change in the upstream variable;  

d) time  lag  (if  change  transmission  is  not  instantaneous)  expressed  as  weeks/months/years; and  

e) minimum threshold for the change in the upstream variable (if applicable). 

Two types of change transmission channels:   (i) full channel: a double arrow from an upstream variable X to a downstream variable Y, 

if X is sufficient to induce change in Y;   (ii) half channel: a single arrow from an upstream variable X to a downstream variable Y, 

if X is necessary but not sufficient to induce change in variable Y. Half channels from a  set of variables such as {U, V, W} to variable Z, need to be all activated before change  can be transferred to Z.  

   Figure 1 : Change transmission channels  

“Additivity” and “Transitivity” are two main characteristics of change transmission in the model  that allows running scenarios of change on the causal map. Once initiated in one or more of  the  independent variables, change  is transmitted throughout the network given the transfer  ratio and time lag for each channel. For full channels the transmission is automatic, as soon as  a variable incurs a change, the channels proceeding from it become activated and transmit to  the downstream  variables. The  same  applies  for half  channels  as  soon as all half  channels  converging to a node are activated.  

The model is constructed as a causal map or a causal semantic network, (a directed graph, in  which variables are represented by nodes, interrelationships are represented by causal links). 

‐ Origins: nodes which have outgoing influences or causal links, but no incoming links;   ‐ Middle nodes: have both outgoing and incoming causal links;   ‐ End nodes: have incoming causal links and no outgoing links.  

Sources of change either controllable or uncontrollable are origins of the graph, for a middle  node to be a source of change it has to be controllable and all links leading to it have to be time  lagged.  

In highly connected situations, closed loops of cause–effect relationships may exist. Loops are  mutual causal relationships because in a loop the influence of an element comes back to itself  through other elements. Simulation of scenarios of change allows analysis of the  loop effect  over  time. A  feedback  loop challenging  the change back  to  its starting node has  to be  time  lagged. The causal loops in the model structure are checked while saving the model with the  time lags of 0 are not allowed.  This way, the change in this node at the beginning of a scenario  will cause a second wave of change reaching at this node after the time lag; this change is in  turn propagated again through the network.    

D6.2 Policy Modelling and Simulation Tool  

16 | P a g e    

© Copyright 2015, Stockholm University, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences (DSV) 

2 Fundamental simulation concepts 

2.1 State of the system 

The  “status  quo  level  of  the  system”  or  the  baseline  scenario,  is  a  projection  of  the  characteristics and behaviour of the system at the beginning of the analysis. It is used as a point  of comparison.  

The model is expressed in terms of percentage change relative to the baseline scenario, thus  the initial values of relative change for all variables in the system are set to zero, i.e. the initial  state in terms of the relative change is the null vector (0, 0, …, 0). 

The simulation runs are based on discrete time points (T0, T1, T2, …, Tn), and the user is required  to define a  time  step T,  time period between  two  consecutive  time points as a number of  weeks, months or years; and maximum number of iterations (n) for the simulation.  

The state of the system at time Ti  is then defined as the values of all variables in the system at  time point Ti of the simulation run, given a specific scenario of change.  

The desired state of the system  is given by targeted changes  in a set of  impact variables of  interest  to  the decision‐maker,  represented  in  a  goal  vector.  Each  actor has  a  goal  vector  reflecting the targets of that actor. 

2.2 Scenarios of Change 

The long‐term implications of policy making imply the need to consider the range of possible  futures,  sometimes characterised by  large uncertainties. “Scenarios” are a main method of  projection, trying to show more than one picture of the future. Scenario analysis is designed to  improve decision‐making by allowing consideration of future conditions or outcomes and their  implications.  

“The analysis of scenarios of change allows the design of strategies to take place in spite of the  messiness of the situation” [13]. Scenario‐driven planning is a widely employed methodology  that helps decision makers devise strategic alternatives and  think about possible  futures.  It  closes the gap between problem framing which depends on qualitative analysis and problem  solving  which  depends  on  quantitative  analysis  by  blending  qualitative  and  quantitative  analytics into a unified methodology [14].  

A  qualitative  analysis  of  the  causal mapping model  can  show  the  opportunities  for  policy  interventions to achieve targeted increases or decreases in impact variables defined as policy  objectives.  The policy options  represent different  combined  and  controlled  changes  in  the  system inputs to produce the targeted outcomes.  By quantifying these changes, scenarios of  change can be defined as a combination of specified percentage changes occurring at a specific  time point or at successive time points. Quantifying the policy goals in the form of a goal vector  defined for each actor allows the analysis of these scenarios with respect to goal achievement.  In  addition,  structural  analysis  of  the  causal  map,  can  support  scenario  analysis  (e.g.,  reachability analysis  shows  the ability of a  scenario of  change  triggered at an  independent  variable to achieve a particular goal if the goal variable is reachable from this variable).  

A “pure scenario” is a scenario of change in one particular independent variable, while a “mixed  scenario” is a scenario of change in more one than one independent variable. We also need to  differentiate between “alternative futures”, scenarios of change in uncontrollable independent  variables caused by natural or external forces, and “alternative actions”, scenarios of change in  controllable independent variables willed by actors.  

D6.2 Policy Modelling and Simulation Tool  

17 | P a g e    

© Copyright 2015, Stockholm University, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences (DSV) 

The alternative futures reflect the concept of “uncertainty”: each possible future provides a  projection of changes in uncontrollable sources of change, a probability is assigned to each of  the possible futures. The alternative actions by actors reflect the different policy options, i.e.,  the  changes  of  controllable  sources  of  change  as  policy  instruments,  given  some  future  circumstances. The user can define as many scenarios of change as needed, using combinations  of alternative  futures and courses of action by actors. A  friendly user  interface  for scenario  triggering is designed to allow creating scenarios. In this way, analysing the behaviour of the  system  under  various  conditions  yields  a much  deeper  understanding  of  the  problem  and  supports the design of policy options.  

2.3 Goal feasibility and compatibility 

The design of policy options can be described in terms of planning of means and resources. The  formulation and evaluation of policy options can be addressed by answering questions like:  

 What  variables  are  relevant  and  controlled  by  actors  of  the  problem  and  what  constraints apply to them?  

 What variables are relevant but are not subject to control?    How do controlled and uncontrolled variables interact to produce an outcome?    What are the actions needed to generate a desirable state of the system or to block 

the occurrence of an undesired one?    What are the costs and benefits of these actions? 

Decision‐makers  at  senior  levels  of  government  operate  within  a  finite  set  of  available  resources and timelines. Furthermore, there are inherent constraints that the decision‐maker  needs  to  consider,  such  as  annual  cycles  for  strategic  planning,  budget,  and  legislation.  Legislative  and  political  imperatives  add  to  the  complexity  of  government  policy  decision‐ making and the selection of policies. 

For an actor, the triggering of change in one the controllable variables imposes the expenditure  of  funds and resources.    If an actor has the required resources and/or  funds available  for a  course  of  action  that  realizes  his  goals,  assuming  inactivity  of  other  actors  and  external  environment,  then his goal vector  is “internally  feasible”.  If  the  required  resources are not  available,  then  there  is  an  intrinsic  problem  of  consistency  between  the  actor’s  goals  and  capabilities.  

When considering the moves of other actors and the changing external environment, if no pure  or mixed scenario can be found to realize the actor’s goals, then his goal vector is said to be  “infeasible”.  If  it was found as an “internally feasible” goal, then the actor has a problem to  synchronize with the other actors. If a scenario could be found to realize the actor’s goals, then  his goal vector is said to be “feasible”. If it was not found as an “internally feasible” goal, then  the actor  is benefiting from  interacting with the whole system  in turning potential problems  and constraints into opportunities. 

The concept of compatibility is connected to the concept of feasibility. Components of a single  goal vector, as well as goal vectors of different actors are called “compatible” if a scenario of  changes can be found to realize them jointly. Goal compatibility is a graded concept; two goals  that can be realised by the same pure scenario are more compatible than two goals requiring  a mixture of pure scenarios. 

2.4 Tactics and Game theoretic analysis  

The competitive analysis aims at establishing counterplans at the earliest time, by anticipating  the evolving circumstances and the competitors’ moves. This allows policy makers to shape 

D6.2 Policy Modelling and Simulation Tool  

18 | P a g e    

© Copyright 2015, Stockholm University, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences (DSV) 

policies that takes into account their competitors’ likely responses when deciding on their own  actions, by quantifying and estimating the utility each actor has in the alternative courses of  action, while accounting for the possible alternative futures. 

A tactic is simply a sequence of changes triggered at controlled variables by an actor that would  help realize his goal vector. A tactic  is a course of action  logically paired with an alternative  future and what other actors might do. 

Simulation of the alternative futures would bring up the various vulnerabilities of the system.  Then the design of policy options can take place based on the provided insight from analysis of  different pure and mixed scenarios of change. Policy options can be viewed as a defensive tactic  if the actions taken by actors are subsequent to the change in uncontrollable sources or it can  be viewed as an offensive tactic if the actions precede the change in uncontrollable sources.  

A policy option can be either the combination of actions taken by the involved actors that may  achieve the policy targets in a cooperative decision‐making (co‐decision legislative) situation;  or the sequence of actions taken by the focal actor to preempt/counter natural, external forces  and/or other competitors’ moves in a competitive decision‐making situation.  

The Game  theoretic analyses are based on  the  idea of a  ‘tactic’ as a sequence of moves  to  preempt or counter nature’s or other competitors’ moves. It then allows either to devise one  tactic  for  the set of actors  involved  in a cooperative decision‐making situation which would  yield optimal result in achieving the policy objectives; or to devise one tactic which would yield  optimal results for the focal actor in a competitive decision‐making situation.   The effectiveness of a tactic of an actor is a measure or at least an evaluation of the degree to  which it helps him realize his goal. The efficiency of a tactic is a measure of the use of resources  to  realize  the  goals. Both  the  tactical  effectiveness  and efficiency need  to be measured  in  comparison to the competing tactics the actor might choose from and also in connection to the  tactics and futures the actor aims at countering or preempting. 

The following steps are needed  in order to be able to compare the alternative tactics by an  actor to counter a scenario of change or to rank different actors in a given scenario of change  according to effectiveness and efficiency of their tactics:  

1‐ Define a preference profile for each actor, in relation to policy impacts and goals: a ranking  of the goal vector components to allow comparison of tactics based on realising the goals  and a preferred change direction in each of the other impact variables to compare tactics  based on their side effects in addition to policy targets7. 

2‐ The time steps required to achieve the targeted change in goal variables and the stability  of outcomes can be used to assess tactical effectiveness. 

3‐ Define a cost function for changes triggered at the controlled sources of change for each  actor. As a default,  the  cost  function  can be  in  the  form of a  value  scale  for  the  cost  associated to levels of change in each controlled decision variable, so that tactics can be  ranked according to efficiency, (i.e. use of natural, human and capital resources).  

4‐ For each scenario of change, analysis of changes in goal variables can provide ranking of  tactics of the different actors according to tactical effectiveness, while analysis of changes  in controlled variables can provide ranking of tactics according to tactical efficiency. 

                                                             7 For example, the goal vector (0, +20%, ‐15%, 0, +10%) corresponding to outcome or impact variables  V1, V2, V3, V4, V5 respectively. Can be ranked as: V3, V2, V5, V4, V1 or can be given weights showing the  relative importance of each goal component as (0, 0.3, 0.5, 0, 0.2) 

D6.2 Policy Modelling and Simulation Tool  

19 | P a g e    

© Copyright 2015, Stockholm University, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences (DSV) 

3 Simulation Process 

3.1 Generating Scenarios 

The identification and creation of new alternatives is one of the most important aspects of any  decision support. If the decision alternatives under consideration are weak, it will lead to a poor  choice  [16].  Thus,  support  in  the  generation  of  feasible  options  is  important  for  policy  formulation. 

The simulation is run upon the policy problem model (causal map), and the set of goal variables  with their target values are used for impact appraisal, i.e., defining efficiency and effectiveness  of  a  scenario  for  fulfilling  the  objectives.  Based  on  the  simulation  results  unsatisfactory  scenarios are filtered out, while efficient and “interesting” scenarios are suggested as policy  options for further evaluation.  

The simulation database stores the system state at each time step of the simulation run, for  each specific scenario of change. An initially large sample of scenarios generated by, e.g., full  factorial  design  or  Latin  hypercube  sampling,  can  be  a  starting  point  with  unsatisfactory  scenarios (not realising the goal vector or being dominated) are filtered out, while scenarios  deemed efficient (according to some predefined decision rule based upon resource constraints  and goal compatibility) are suggested as policy options for further evaluation. 

3.2 Graph change analysis 

Graph change analysis allows us to investigate the dynamic consequences of entering a change  in one of the graph origins, thus simulating the propagation of change throughout the causal  map. The simulation tool should provide visualizations of the scenarios and a way of sorting  them according to the impact assessments.  

The use of discrete  time points and a maximum number of  iterations  for  the calculation of  change transfer and the system state, allows computation in case of successive lagged changes  in sources of change and also makes it possible to trace the change transfer along causal loops  without the need for calculating the limit behaviour of the loop. This solves the computational  complexity problem of infinite causal loops.  The main assumption for transmission of change is that “the percentage relative change in a  downstream variable Y is a linear function of the percentage relative change in an upstream  variable X”. There  can be objections  to  the basic  linearity of  the  system, but  for  long‐term  planning it is important to keep the structure of the model simple. In addition, the definition of  time lags, minimum thresholds quantifications of the change transmission channels besides the  existence of the half channels add a meaningful dimension of nonlinearity to the model. 

Change  transfer  coefficients  are  dimensionless,  since  changes  in  the model  variables  are  expressed  in  terms  of  percentage  relative  changes  (relative  to  the  status‐quo  level  of  the  variable). Assuming that dX/X represents the relative change in a variable X, then the relative  change dY/Y in a downstream variable Y is given by Equation 2.1 for a full channel, where a is  the real valued change transfer coefficient for the link XY. 

      (2.1) 

  Figure 2 : single full channel example 

Y Y

a X X d=d

D6.2 Policy Modelling and Simulation Tool  

20 | P a g e    

© Copyright 2015, Stockholm University, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences (DSV) 

In the case of multiple channels such that change is transferred to variable Z from channels XZ  and  YZ,  then  given  that  both  channels  are  activated  the  change  is  additive  according  to  Equation 2.2.   

      (2.2) 

Figure 3 : multiple full channels example  

In the general case, given a set of activated channels {X1Z, X2Z, …, XnZ} going into Z, then  

      (2.3) 

For half channels, change transmission is sub‐additive. Consider the case of three half‐channels  all of which have to be activated to allow change transfer to node Z. If  ,  ,   are the times  at which upstream links  ,  ,   become activated and  ,  ,   are the time lags of these  links; then times at which the signal to change reaches Z from each of the upstream nodes X,  Y, W, are:  ,  ,   respectively. Change occurs at Z at the latest of the three  times. [11] 

Figure 4 : multiple half channels example 

3.3 Data, forecasting and predictive validation 

There are historical methods of validation, including: Rationalism – logic deductions from the  assumptions are used to develop a valid/correct model; Empiricism – every assumption and  output is empirically tested; Positive economist – most important is the predictive ability of the  model.  Based  on  these  three  historical  methods  of  validation,  Naylor  and  Finger  (1967)  proposed a multistage process of validation consisting of [15]: 

‐ Developing  the  model  assumptions  based  on  theory,  observations  and  domain  knowledge; 

‐ Validating assumptions, where possible, by empirically testing them;  ‐ Comparing  or  testing  the  input/output  relationships  of  the model  against  the  real 

system.   Predictive Validation:   The model is used to predict (forecast) the system’s behaviour, and then comparisons are made  between the system’s behaviour and the model’s forecast to determine if they are the same.  Once validated by  reproducing historical behaviour,  the model allows understanding of  the 

Y Yc

X Xa

Z Z ddd



 

 n

i i

i i X

Xa Z Z

1

dd

D6.2 Policy Modelling and Simulation Tool  

21 | P a g e    

© Copyright 2015, Stockholm University, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences (DSV) 

ultimate  policy  impacts,  detecting  problems  and  evidencing  the  emergence  of  initially  unperceived risks, through its ability to infer what will be the likely outcomes of the alternative  futures or actions taken by actors of the system. 

Simulation of validated models ensures long‐term thinking through simulating over long time  periods  while  still  being  confident  on  the  outcomes.  The  scenario  analysis  should  be  complemented by  controlled experimentation based on  statistical  theory,  (e.g.,  forecasting  models and regression models).  

Appropriate, accurate and sufficient data are needed for: (i) building the conceptual model –  developing mathematical  and  logical  relationships  to  represent  the problem  entity  for  the  intended purpose of the model; (ii) validating the model; (iii) performing experiments on the  validated model.  

The availability of historical time series, allows for validation of the model in order to assess  the  correctness  of  the modelling  assumptions,  before  assessing  the  consequences  of  the  scenarios of change (policy impacts).   

Sensitivity analysis:  Changing the values of the  internal parameters of the model to determine the effect on the  model’s  behaviour.  These  parameters  are  SENSITIVE,  can  cause  significant  changes  in  the  model behaviour and should be made as accurate as possible before using the model. 

D6.2 Policy Modelling and Simulation Tool  

22 | P a g e    

© Copyright 2015, Stockholm University, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences (DSV) 

4 Policy Analysis Model building Process  We suggest a step‐wise procedure that enables the user to build a causal mapping simulation  model for the policy problem at hand and allows to organize the storage and retrieval of the  different policy  issues,  the  resulting models, models’ components, data sets and simulation  runs  in  the decision support system database. The cases of policy analysis on  the sense4us  platform  are  defined  as  ‘policy  problems’  and  several  impact  assessment models  can  be  defined for each policy problem.  

Each policy problem  is described and classified using a friendly GUI that takes the form of a  questionnaire and is considered as the dialogue subsystem of the DSS. The following steps show  the process of defining a policy problem and building search queries to identify elements of the  policy model from the various information sources.  Note that:  ‐ The two main elements of the policy model of interest here are: 

1‐ Actors:         a) Official actors (executive – legislative)        b) Unofficial actors (Including interested parties and stakeholders)  2‐ Variables:       a) Controllable independent variables (policy instruments)       b) Uncontrollable independent variables (external factors and constraints)       c) Dependent variables (policy impacts) 

‐ The Ultra Low Emission Vehicles (ULEV) Uptake policy problem (described in Appendix III) is  also used as an illustrative example: 

Step 1. Define a policy problem  A policy problem is defined using a title and an optional short text description by the user and  is given an ID by the system.   1‐ Policymaking level: (EU level, National level, Local level)  2‐ Geographical area: (A set of EU countries – EU level; A country and a set of local regions –  National level; A local region – Local level). 

  Figure 5 : User interface for defining a new policy problem  

Step 2. Define scope of the policy analysis model  The user sets the boundaries of the policy impact assessment, as a guideline for the modelling  process and as an output to other tools in the Sense4us toolkit to guide the search processes.  This includes defining the objective(s) of the policy analysis, the time aspect of the analysis and  the related policy domain or governmental activity (the list here might vary according to the 

D6.2 Policy Modelling and Simulation Tool  

23 | P a g e    

© Copyright 2015, Stockholm University, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences (DSV) 

policymaking  level).  The  aim  of  this  description  or  classification  is  to  facilitate  the  query  processes to reuse model components from stored policy models, identify trends in groups of  policy  problems  and  to  provide  inputs  to  the  Sense4us  toolset  to  guide  the  information  searching process. 

  Figure 6 : User interface for defining scope of the policy model  

Step 3. Building information search queries and processing of results  There are several possibilities to be investigated through the implementation and development  of the user interface on how to build information search queries and data exchange between  the different work packages.  

 A basic search using keywords of the policy problem title. Here, the objective of this  basic search  is to help  the user  to  identify:  (i)  the different ways of referring to  the  policy  problem  in  online  information  sources;  and  (ii)  the main  issues  or  the  sub‐ problems, in order to make sure that the resulting information model is covering and  connecting these main aspects of the policy problem. An example is shown in figure 7,  from which we can notice  that  the Electric Cars policy problem  is mentioned using  different terms in the information sources and can be divided into four sub‐problems  using terms of the top results of the basic search. 

 Iterative information searches. In addition to the search queries built within the WP4  and WP5 tools, the user interface of the modelling tool allows building search queries  using keywords of the identified main issues, also allows building queries using single  text items (concepts that qualify as model variables). For example, one concept to be  searched for surroundings, two concepts to be searched for interlinking using the WP4  LOD search tools or running Twitter searches using the WP5 tools. 

Also, concepts from the visualized search results in LOD surroundings map or the SentiCircles  can be sent to the policy model when identified by the user as candidate model components.  The information sources labelled in figure 7 are: 

 #Evidence:  evidence  online  sources,  experts’  and  scientific  knowledge  about  the  problem either mental or written 

 #WP4: Linked open data search tools of WP4    #WP5: Public online policy discussions’ Topic labelling and Sentiments analysis tools of 

WP5 

D6.2 Policy Modelling and Simulation Tool  

24 | P a g e    

© Copyright 2015, Stockholm University, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences (DSV) 

  Figure 7 : Example for a basic search query using the policy problem title  

Different sets of keywords for the different categories of the policy model elements can also  be used for building search queries or for processing of the results. The objective is to build an  information model of the policy problem, listing the model components associated to the main  issues and categorised as actors, external factors and constraints, policy instruments and policy  impacts. The user interface also enables the user to select the areas of policy impacts of interest  for the policy problem at hand as shown in figure 8. 

  Figure 8 : User interface for selecting areas of policy impacts  

These  sets of keywords are  to be  reviewed and updated  through  learning  from  the  search  results  and  users’  inputs.  Note  that  the  keywords  are  considered  in  singular/plural  noun/adjective forms, and in different languages, if needed. Tables 5 shows a set of suggested  keywords  for actors.   Keywords representing  the different citizen  target groups can also be  added  (e.g., male/female,  infants/children/young  adults/adults/senior  citizens/  elderly/old  aging, handicap/special needs).  

D6.2 Policy Modelling and Simulation Tool  

25 | P a g e    

© Copyright 2015, Stockholm University, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences (DSV) 

O ffi cia

l A ct or s  Agency  Civil  Directorate  Legal/Legislative  Political 

Attorney  Commission  Executive  Member  Public  Authority  Committee  Federal  Ministry  Secretary  Board  Council  General  Office   Section  Bureau  Department  Govern  Parliament  State  Cabinet  Deputy  Institute  Party  Unit 

Un of fic ia l 

Ac to rs  

Association  Employee  Group  Organisation  Trade  Business  Exporter  Importer  Producer  Trust  Citizen  Federation  Industry  Professional  Union  Community  Foundation  Manufacturer  Research  University  Company  Development  Partner  Society  User  Consumer  Donor  Private  System  Worker 

Table 5 : Keywords for actors 

Similarly, Table 6 shows a set of keywords  for  the different policy  instruments used  for  the  controllable sources of change.  

Economic policy instruments:  Financial  ownership  procurement  expenditure  fund  subsidies  Fiscal  incentives  tax  fee  charge  loan  Market  rights  contract  permit  insurance  property  Regulatory policy instruments:  access  conformity  equity  norm  regulation     compliance  control  law  pricing  restriction    compulsory  enforce  Liability  protection  standard    Informational policy instruments:  advertise  campaign  awareness  knowledge  promote    advice   Information   gestures  Pilots  symbols    Capacity‐building policy instruments:  capacity  research  train        develop  skill  innovation        Cooperation policy instruments:  Agreement  Technology transfer  Treaty      External factors and constraints:  Attitude  Economic growth  behaviour  Objective     Context  Population growth  demographic  Resource availability   Commitment  External environment  International  Global   

Table 6 : Keywords for sources of change 

Examples for sources of keywords and terms in relation to EU policy domains:  

(1) Thematic glossaries on the European commission website:  http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/statistics‐explained/index.php/Thematic_glossaries  (2) IATE ‐ The EU’s multilingual term base:    http://iate.europa.eu/SearchByQueryLoad.do?method=load  (3) Glossary of financial terms:   http://www.afme.eu/Glossary‐of‐financial‐terms.aspx 

D6.2 Policy Modelling and Simulation Tool  

26 | P a g e    

© Copyright 2015, Stockholm University, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences (DSV) 

Step 4: Data exchange with other work packages 

The information search results are sent via an API to the policy modelling and simulation tool.  The  concepts  categorized  as  different model  elements  and  associated  to  the main  issues,  constitute an information model of the policy problem that can be used as a basis to build a  mental model (causal map) of the policy problem.   For the purpose of the data exchange protocol, we have defined codes for the 20 categories of  the model elements (as shown in table 7). 

1  Official actor  11 Energy‐related impact  2  Unofficial actor  12 Environment‐related impact  3  Economic policy instrument  13 Social impact  4  Regulatory policy instrument  14 Infrastructure‐related impact  5  Informational policy instrument  15 Transport‐related impact  6  Capacity‐building instrument  16 Health‐related impact  7  Cooperation instrument  17 Education‐related impact  8  External factors & constraints  18  Technology‐related impact  9  Economic impact  19 Judicial / Legal impact  10  Financial impact  20 Security & Defense‐related impact 

Table 7 : Coded categories of model elements 

In addition, codes for the main issues need to be defined. For the ULEV use case, for example,  the main  issues are coded as: 1‐ Support; 2‐  Infrastructure; 3‐ Technologies; 4‐ Awareness.  Table 8 shows examples for some information search results with the corresponding codes. 

Text item  Category Main issue  “Department for Transport”  1‐ Official actor “Plug‐in Car Tax treatments”  3‐ Economic instrument 1‐ Support  “Funding for charging infrastructure” 3‐ Economic instrument 2‐ Infrastructure  “Regulating  access  to  chargepoints  across UK” 

4‐ Regulatory instrument 2‐ Infrastructure 

“Investment in R&D” 6‐ Capacity building instrument 3‐ Technologies  “Promote  public  understanding  of  availability of support” 

5‐ Informational instrument 4‐ Awareness 

“Governmental spending ‐ Transport” 10‐ Financial impact 1‐ Support  “Number  of  publicly  available  chargepoints” 

14‐Infrastructure‐related impact 2‐ Infrastructure 

“ULEV  battery  capacity”/  “charging  time” 

15‐ Technology‐related impact 4‐ Technologies 

Table 8 : Examples for the categorised search results 

The exchange of data is done using json files format. An example that shows the structure of  the json file is shown below:  {      problemTitle: “Ultra low emission vehicles (ULEV) uptake”,      problemId:    “UK‐N‐T‐005‐2014”,      userId:          150,      textItems: [          {              category:   3,              mainIssue: 1, 

D6.2 Policy Modelling and Simulation Tool  

27 | P a g e    

© Copyright 2015, Stockholm University, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences (DSV) 

            text:          ” Plug‐in Car Tax treatments ”         },          {              category:   1,              text:          “Department for Transport”          }          {              category:   3,              mainIssue: 2,              text:          ” Funding for charging infrastructure ”          },          {              category:   5,              mainIssue: 4,              text:          ” Promote public understanding of availability of support ”          },          {              category:   10,              mainIssue: 1,              text:          ” Governmental spending ‐ Transport ”          },          {              category:   14,              mainIssue: 2,              text:          ” Number of publicly available chargepoints ”          }      ]  } 

Here we have four properties of the root object: ‘problemTitle’ is a string, ‘problemId’ is a string, ‘userId’  is a number,  ‘textItems’  is an array  consists of:  ‘category’  (number),  ‘mainIssue’  (number) and  ‘text’  (string).  A null category means that the text item is not categorized, i.e., none of the filtering keywords exist to  put it in one of the categories.  A null mainIssue means that the item is not associated to a specific main issue. 

Step 5: Iconic representation of the model elements. 

In this step, the user can select elements from the information model, imports elements to the  graphing canvas where an icon is assigned to each elements. Figure 9 shows the information  model that appears as an expand/collapse tree on the right panel and the toolbar on the left  panels for the different categories of the model elements on the simulation tool interface in  the model building mode.  

D6.2 Policy Modelling and Simulation Tool  

28 | P a g e    

© Copyright 2015, Stockholm University, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences (DSV) 

  Figure 9 : Import concepts to the causal map graphing canvas   

D6.2 Policy Modelling and Simulation Tool  

29 | P a g e    

© Copyright 2015, Stockholm University, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences (DSV) 

Step 6. Define actors’ powers and goals  For each actor of the model, define the actor’s controlled sources of change, goal vectors and  preferences of goals realization (i.e., ranking of the goal vector components). In addition, for  each impact variable a preference of the change direction, which can be “increase”, “decrease”,  or “no change”). 

  Figure 10 : User interface for defining actors’ powers and goals  

Step 7. Define indicators and measures for model variables and links to time series  This step involves the definition of how to measure the concepts and decide which indicators  should  be  used.  The  indicators  should  be  relevant  to  the  scope,  easy  to  track  over  time,  measurable  through  quantitative metrics  or  value  scales. Open  governmental  data  portals  provide statistical data and indicators for the different policy domains. 

  Figure 11 : User interface for defining measures and mapping time series to them   

The user can be supported with the key indicators related to the different policy domains to be  used for simulation. There exist a set of indicators and measures for which numerical data sets  and time‐series are available on open data portals, For example:   (1) EuroStat – European Commission Statistics:  

http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/data/browse‐statistics‐by‐theme  http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/sdi/indicators  http://ec.europa.eu/health/indicators/echi/index_en.htm 

(2) Data catalogue of the organisation for economic cooperation and development (OECD):  https://data.oecd.org/ 

(3) World Bank data catalog:     http://data.worldbank.org/  (4) European Environment Agency:      http://www.eea.europa.eu/themes 

Step 9. Define the causal links and interrelationships: 

Using the tool, the user can connect the nodes using two types of the causal links or change  transmission channels, described in section 1.3.  

D6.2 Policy Modelling and Simulation Tool  

30 | P a g e    

© Copyright 2015, Stockholm University, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences (DSV) 

Step 10. Edit nodes’ and links’ properties 

Add a description of each variable, the status‐quo level and measurement unit of the  selected  indicator.  For  the  sources  of  change,  define  the maximum  and minimum  possible values and steps for change to allow for automatic scenario generation. Define  quantifications of  the causal  links and verify  them  through statistical analysis of  the  data sets for  indicators. In case of unavailability of statistical data, the quantification  can be done based on available expertise or scientific evidence. 

  Figure 12 : Edit node and link properties  

Step 11. Define and simulate a scenario of change 

Switch to the simulation mode of the tool, define a scenario of change, the time step and max  number of iterations and simulate this scenario as in figure 13.  

  Figure 13 : User interface for defining a scenario of changes and the scenario simulation as viewed on 

the causal mapping canvas  

D6.2 Policy Modelling and Simulation Tool  

31 | P a g e    

© Copyright 2015, Stockholm University, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences (DSV) 

Generate and run different scenarios of change to design and simulate policy options. Start  with  the  “Reference  scenario”,  (Do‐nothing  option–  no  policy  intervention  takes  places),  followed by a set of pure scenarios then mixed scenarios for each actor and finally simulate  combinations of the courses of actions by multiple actors “policy options”.   Results for each simulation run are visualized using simple charts and stored in the database  for further analysis (impact assessment of policy options).   A  toy example of a quantified simulation model with results  for  few  time steps  is shown  in  figure 14. 

Figure 14 : Causal mapping model example      

  Ti m e  st ep : T

 =  6  m

on th s,  m ax . n

um be r o

f i te ra tio

ns  =  1 0,  (e

.g .,  T4

 m ea

ns  a fte

r 2 4  m on

th s)  

D6.2 Policy Modelling and Simulation Tool  

32 | P a g e    

© Copyright 2015, Stockholm University, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences (DSV) 

Below is a description of the model components of the toy example: 

(i) two controllable sources of change: (A) is controlled by an executive actor (Actor1) through  a financial policy  instrument and (E)  is controlled by a  legislative actor through a regulatory  policy instrument; 

(ii) an uncontrollable source of change (G) that represent an external barrier or a driving force  for change; 

(iii) direct impact variables: (B) financial impact, (D) environmental impact, (F) energy‐related  impact, (J) environmental impact and (H) technology‐related impact; 

(iv) indirect impact variables: (C) economic impact, (K) healthcare‐related impact, (P) economic  impact, (Q) social impact and (L) economic impact; 

‐ In sum, the model has 13 nodes: 3 origins A, E and G; 7 middle nodes and 3 end nodes P,  Q and L; and 17 change transmission channels all are full channels, except for CK and JK  are half channels. 

‐ The defined time step T=6 months, the maximum number of iterations is 10. Starting point  of the analysis is T0=0 and ending at T10= 60 months (5 years). 

‐ The example shows a scenario of changes composed of: a possible future (lagged changes  in the uncontrollable source G) and a policy option (actions taken by actors, an increase  10% in E at T0 and consecutive lagged increases in A: 7.5% at T0, 7.5% at T2=12 months and  10% at T4= 24 months). 

‐ The model contains a causal loop BD‐DJ‐JB  ‐ Goal vector corresponding to outcome variables P, Q and L respectively: for actor1 (+20%, 

+10%, 0) and for actor2 (0, +15%, +10%). 

D6.2 Policy Modelling and Simulation Tool  

33 | P a g e    

© Copyright 2015, Stockholm University, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences (DSV) 

5 Conclusion  The main contribution of this design research study is defining standards and a procedure for  policy  modelling  and  simulation  based  on  the  information  gathered  from  various  online  sources,  including  Linked open data  search  results  from WP4 and evidence extracted  from  online public political discussions by WP5. In order to create customisable and reusable models,  the approach  introduces  standardised  categories and  subcategories of  the model elements  (e.g., executive actors, policy instruments, external factors, policy impacts … ), to be defined in  relation to a definite set of the main issues or sub‐problems identified by the user through the  modelling process.  It also  introduces a procedure  for defining  indicators and measures and  quantifying the change transfer throughout the model. 

A prototype for the policy‐oriented modelling and simulation tool presented in this report, has  been implemented in a Node.js environment and is accessible both from a web‐based graphical  user  interface as well as a hosted API. The prototype provides a  fully computerised object‐ oriented  implementation of the model building, scenario triggering, scenario simulation and  game theoretic computations.  

The  modelling  approach  is  based  on  “Acar’s  Causal  mapping  and  situation  formulation  method”, with the following modifications and enhancements: First, defining the causal links  based on causal inferences extracted from verbal description of the problem and quantifying  change transfer using time‐series from trusted data sources, instead of merely estimations by  the decision‐maker. Thus,  it  results  in a mathematical model  that  identifies  influences and  trends building on reliable historical data to produce forecasts. Second, linking to game theory  concepts to perform competitive analysis for the involved actors. Third, creating scenarios of  change in terms alternative futures and alternative courses of action (policy options), instead  of  defining  individual  scenarios  by  the  decision  maker.  Finally,  the  discretization  of  the  simulation  runs over  time and defining a maximum number of  iterations allows analysis of  successive waves of changes entered at  the  sources of change and allows computations of  causal loops with no need to calculate their limit behaviour. 

The simplicity of the proposed policy modelling approach allows engagement of a wide range  of policymakers and stakeholders in a unified method in which barriers, constraints, dilemmas,  assumptions,  dependencies,  delays,  goals,  reference,  future  and  planned  scenarios  are  described and analysed.  

Being  both  intuitive  and  analytical,  it  allows  the planners  to monitor  the  changes  to  their  system and its environment and analysing their implications, in order to understand the cost  of action and inaction, and reach satisfactory and optimal tactics and strategies in each specific  situation. For  instance, this might be helpful  in  investigating the technological extrapolation  scenarios in which there is no agreement.  

Enhancements and Future work  ‐ Integration of text analysis algorithms for causal inference extraction from textual data 

using Natural Language Processing.   ‐ Integration to Multi‐criteria decision analysis (MCDA) models ‐ building criteria models 

and data  formats  for policy  appraisal based on  the problem model  and  simulation  results. (D6.3) 

‐ Consideration of more complex forms of the cause‐effect relationships (influences or  causal  links),  including:  time‐/  value‐  dependent  change  transfer  coefficients  or  differential equations.  

D6.2 Policy Modelling and Simulation Tool  

34 | P a g e    

© Copyright 2015, Stockholm University, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences (DSV) 

‐ The simulation as a serious game. Adding the formal structural elements of games —  e.g., fun, play, rules, a goal, winning, challenges, competition, in addition to the feature  of processing or debriefing using artificial intelligence techniques. 

D6.2 Policy Modelling and Simulation Tool  

35 | P a g e    

© Copyright 2015, Stockholm University, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences (DSV) 

6 References  [1] Mitchell  B.  (2009).  Policy‐making  process.  Available:  (retrieved  on  10/03/2015) 

http://www.waterencyclopedia.com/Oc‐Po/Policy‐Making‐Process.html  [2] Davies  PT  (2004),  “Is  evidence‐based  government  possible?”  Jerry  Lee  lecture.  4th 

Annual Campbell Collaboration Colloquium Washington D.C.   [3] Koliba  C.,  Zia A.,  (2011),  Theory  Testing Using  Complex  Systems Modelling  in  Public 

Administration and Policy Studies: Challenges and Opportunities for a Meta‐Theoretical  Research Program, Proceedings of the 2011 Public Management Research Conference,  Maxwell School of citizenship and public affairs at Syracuse University. 

[4] Wacław  B.,  (2014),  Regulation  Impact  Assessment  (RIA)  at  Poland  and  at  Some  EU  Countries.  Procedia  ‐  Social  and  Behavioral  Sciences  Volume  109,  Pages  45–50.  2nd  World Conference on Business, Economics and Management. 

[5] Easton, D. (1965). A systems analysis of political life. New York: John‐ Wiley & Sons.  [6] Rouse, W.B & N.M. Morris (1986): On Looking Into the Black Box: Prospects and Limits 

in the Search for Mental Models. Psychological Bulletin, Vol. 100, No.3, 349363  [7] Wang M. and Laukkanen M., (2015), Comparative Causal mapping: The CMAP3 method. 

Ashgate Publishing, Ltd..  [8] Senge  P.M.  (1990).  The  Fifth  Discipline:  The  Art  and  Practice  of  the  Learning 

Organization. New York: Doubleday Currency.  [9] Sterman J. D. (2000). Business Dynamics: Systems Thinking and Modelling for a Complex 

World. Irwin/McGraw‐Hill: Boston.   [10] Stefano A., Camello C., Riccardo O. & Pietro S. A., (2014): Policy Modelling as a new area 

for  research:  perspectives  for  a  Systems  Thinking  and  System  Dynamics  approach?  Proceedings of the Business systems Laboratory 2nd International Symposium. 

[11] Acar W., (1983). Toward a Theory of Problem Formulation and the Planning of Change:  Causal Mapping and Dialectical Debate in Situation Formulation. Ann Arbor, Michigan:  U.M.I. 

[12] Acar, W. and Druckenmiller, D. (2006). Endowing cognitive mapping with computational  properties for strategic analysis, Futures 38:993‐1009. 

[13] Schoemaker, P.  J. H.  (2002). Profiting From Uncertainty: Strategies  for Succeeding No  Matter What the Future Brings. New York: Free Press. 

[14] Georgantzas, N. C. and W. Acar (1995). Scenario‐Driven Planning: Learning to Manage  Strategic Uncertainty. Westport Connecticut: Quorum Books. 

[15] Naylor,  T.  H.  and  J.  M.  Finger.  1967.  Verification  of  computer  simulation  models.  Management Science 14 (2): B92‐B101. 

[16] Brown R. (2005). Rational Choice and Judgment: Decision Analysis for the Decider. New  York: Wiley. 

D6.2 Policy Modelling and Simulation Tool  

36 | P a g e    

© Copyright 2015, Stockholm University, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences (DSV) 

APPENDIX I – Computation Algorithm  

Below we provide the computation algorithm for the simulation runs in pseudo code. 

Modelling mode: Results in a stored model of the policy problem with data for the different categorised components Actors: Actor 1, … , Actor P Variables: V1, … , Vm

Number of nodes m Number of Uncontrollable origins m1 Number of Controllable origins m2 Number of Dependent variables m3 = m – m1 – m2

Links: L (a,b), a~=b and a,b = 1, …, m (array of records, each record contain link parameters) Define Actors’ powers and targets The controlled variables by each actor The targeted changes in outcome variables for each actor Simulation mode: Input time step T Input max number of iterations n Define a scenario of change: // Alternative future: AF1 For uncontrollable variables k: 1-> m1 Define change instances: time point Ti and amount of change relative to baseline // Policy option: PO1 (combination of actions by multiple actors) For controllable variables k: 1 -> m2 Define change instances: time point Ti and amount of change relative to baseline Scenario Triggering and scenario simulation For i = 0 to n // loop1 // Insert records into the simulation_runs table under the key AF1, PO1 and Ti For j = 1 to m // loop2

If variable Vj is a source of change Planned change = change instance for sources of change variables defined in AF1 or PO1 End if For each incoming link L(*,j) If link L(a,j) is not time lagged Transmitted change = transmitted change instance defined for variable Vj at Ti End if If link L(a,j) is time lagged Delayed change = delayed change instances defined for variable Vj at Ti End if Net change = Planned change + transferred changed + delayed change For each outgoing link L(j,*)

D6.2 Policy Modelling and Simulation Tool  

37 | P a g e    

© Copyright 2015, Stockholm University, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences (DSV) 

If link L(j,b) is not time lagged Define a transmitted change instance for variable Vb at Ti (Net change * change transfer coefficient of the link) End if If link L(j,b) is time lagged Define a delayed change instance for variable Vb at Ti+lag (Net change * change transfer coefficient of the link) End if

End loop 2 End loop1 // Repeat for different combinations of alternative futures and policy options // Use the simulation runs table for further analysis // For each scenario of change, rank actors according to tactical efficiency and tactical effectiveness. Rank tactics of an actor according to tactical efficiency and effectiveness for the implemented scenarios of change.  

D6.2 Policy Modelling and Simulation Tool  

38 | P a g e    

© Copyright 2015, Stockholm University, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences (DSV) 

APPENDIX II – TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS  

Infrastructure 

The  implementation of the simulation tool  is split up between two servers. One pushing the  front‐end to a client, and the second one calculating and storing simulation calculations. In this  way  we  separate  cycle  eating  tasks  from  the  user’s  client.  Since  the  server  is  doing  the  calculations, we already have access  to networks or similar structures and are able  to save  relevant data as we see fit. The front‐end client running in any modern browser will fetch and  push  information  to  the  back‐end  server,  e.g.,  loading  networks,  saving  networks,  and  simulating change. This is done through AJAX calls. Both servers work, right now, without any  kind of authentications. This means anyone, with enough wit, could gain access to extra tools  to deny services. Although, it’s probably better as the denier to abuse NTP servers or something  similar. Don’t host and advertise this tool publicly.  If you do,  implement user management.  These repositories are meant as a proof of concept. 

Front‐end server 

Language/s  Javascript  running  through  Node.js  in  the  back‐end.  Javascript  running  through  clients’  browsers. CSS3/HTML 

Libraries (as seen in package.json)  /* External */  body‐parser  cookie‐parser  connect  ejs  ejs‐locals  express  iconv‐lite  browserify  immutable  uglify‐js  watchify   

/* Developed in‐house */  rh_config‐parser  rh_cookie‐cutter  rh_fe  rh_fe‐controller  rh_logger  rh_router 

Description  This server exposes all the public javascript relevant to the front‐end. It is running behind an  MVC framework because it makes it easier to organize and split up entry‐points for pre‐loading  models etc. The client is based on a framework called Immutable which encourages ‘data‐in, 

D6.2 Policy Modelling and Simulation Tool  

39 | P a g e    

© Copyright 2015, Stockholm University, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences (DSV) 

data‐out’. Almost all of the interface is generated from settings‐files. The core of the client is  within main.js which initializes the environment. 

Back‐end server 

Language/s  Javascript running through Node.js 

Libraries (as seen in package.json)  /* External */  body‐parser  connect  cookie‐parser  debug  ejs  ejs‐locals  express  iconv‐lite  pg‐sync    /* Developed in‐house */  rh_config‐parser  rh_cookie‐cutter  rh_database‐layer  rh_fe  rh_fe‐controller  rh_logger  rh_model  rh_model‐layer  rh_router  rh_user‐manager (implemented, but not authorizing) 

Description  The aspect of this server is just to expose an API without any kind of coupling. The reference  sheet may be found under Resources below. Right now the biggest part of this server is to save  and load data, and simulate changes in a network.The API’s entry‐points is exposed using MVC  design. All calls are REST based, and will comply to those standards. GET requests will recieve  data, POST will  save data, PUT/PATCH will update data, and DELETE will  remove data. The  structure of the requests and responses is available in the reference sheet. 

Resources  Node.js  https://nodejs.org/  Immutable.js  http://facebook.github.io/immutable‐js  Front‐end repository  https://github.com/eGovlab/sense4us‐simulation  Back‐end repository  https://github.com/Rhineheart/sense4us‐simulation‐server  Back‐end API reference sheet  https://docs.google.com/document/d/1HtlTy9CVvz7yrX5IGCr8ITfIKfl0H‐XtbZ7c‐ SolNFI/edit?usp=sharing 

D6.2 Policy Modelling and Simulation Tool  

40 | P a g e    

© Copyright 2015, Stockholm University, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences (DSV) 

APPENDIX III – Policy use cases 

Use case 1  – Ultra Low Emission Vehicles (ULEVs) 

Source:   (Online) House of Commons, Transport Committee, (2012),‘Plug‐in vehicles, plugged in  policy?’, Fourth Report of Session 2012–13, available on:   http://www.parliament.uk/documents/commons‐committees/transport/Plug‐ in%20vehicles%20239.pdf      (Accessed 1/7/2015) 

Description:  

Policy aim:  

The UK Government wants to increase take up of Ultra Low Emission Vehicles (ULEVs)  throughout the UK, as part of its wider plans for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. 

Policy context: 

The  Climate  Change  Act  established  a  legally  binding  target  to  reduce  the  UK’s  greenhouse gas emissions to at least 80% below base year (1990) levels by 2050. 

The Government has stated that, by 2050, domestic transport will need to substantially  reduce its emissions. 

Part  of  the UK Government’s  “vision”  for  reducing  emissions  is  ultra‐low  emission  vehicles (ULEVs) including fully electric, plug‐in hybrid, and fuel cell powered cars. Its  report on delivering a low carbon future states: 

“Over the next decade, average emissions of new cars are set to fall by around a third,  primarily  through more  efficient  combustion  engines.  Sustainable  biofuels will  also  deliver substantial emissions reductions. As deeper cuts are required, vehicles will run  on ultra‐low emission technologies such as electric batteries, hydrogen fuel cells and  plug‐in hybrid technology. These vehicles could also help to deliver wider environmental  benefits, including improved local air quality and reduced traffic noise”. 

The  Government’s  policies  in  this  area  include:  (i)  pressing  for  strong  EU  vehicle  emissions  standards  for  2020  and  beyond  in  order  to  deliver  improvements  in conventional vehicle efficiency and give certainty about future markets for ultra‐low  emission  vehicles;  (ii)  providing  around  £300 million  in  the  2010‐15  Parliament  for  consumer incentives, worth up to £5,000 per car, and further support for the research,  development and demonstration of new technologies; and (iii) providing a £560 million  Local  Sustainable  Transport  Fund  over  the  lifetime  of  the  2010‐15  Parliament,  to  support people to make lower carbon travel choices, such as walking, cycling or public  transport. 

D6.2 Policy Modelling and Simulation Tool  

41 | P a g e    

© Copyright 2015, Stockholm University, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences (DSV) 

Use case 2 – Proposal for a Regulation of the European Parliament and the Council of  EU on: “Personal protective equipment” (PPE8) 

Source:  

 (Online) European  commission  (EC),  (2014)  Impact Assessment  report,  Industry and  Entrepreneurship, ‘Regulation on personal protective equipment’, available on:  http://ec.europa.eu/smart‐regulation/impact/ia_carried_out/cia_2014_en.htm#entr  (Accessed 1/7/2015) 

Description:  

Volume of the EU market:  

€ 5.9 billion, almost 30% of the global market; At  least 4000 Companies; 43% of the  total EU manufacturing workforce.  Top Manufacturers: Italy, Germany, France, UK,  (50% of EU production)  Users:  30%  private  individuals  and  70%  Enterprises  (manufacturing,  construction,  mining, healthcare, agriculture and public services)  The problem has a regulatory nature – regulation failure of the PPE Directive: 

‐ Products on the market that don’t ensure an adequate level of protection  ‐ Market surveillance and risks related to PPE types not covered by the directive  ‐ Divergent approaches of the notified bodies. 

General Objectives:  ‐ High level of health and safety protection for PPE users.  ‐ Free movement of PPE and a fair playing field for PPE economic operators.  ‐ Simplify the EU regulatory environment related to the field of PPE. 

Actors:   A co‐decision legislative procedure, involving the following directorate general of the  European commission: 

‐ DG‐ENTR: Enterprise and Industry  ‐ DG‐SG: Secretariat‐General  ‐ DG‐SJ: Justice and Consumers (JUST)  ‐ DG‐EMPL: Employment, Social Affairs and Inclusion  ‐ DG‐SANCO: Health and Food Safety 

Interested Parties and Stakeholders:  ‐ Member states  ‐ Notified Bodies and representatives from standardisation organisations.  ‐ Market surveillance authorities  ‐ PPE manufacturers federations and trade associations 

                                                             8 PPE: Any device or appliance designed to be worn or held by an individual for protection against one  or more health and safety hazards. 

Examples  of  PPE  are  safety  helmets,  ear muffs,  safety  shoes,  life  jackets  but  also  bicycle  helmets,  sunglasses and high‐visibility vests. Certain types of PPE are excluded from the scope of the PPE Directive,  namely PPE specifically designed and manufactured for use by armed forces or in the maintenance of  law and order, PPE for self‐defence, PPE designed and manufactured for private use against atmospheric  conditions, damp, water and heat, PPE intended for the protection or rescue of persons on vessels or  aircraft, not worn all the time and helmets and visors intended for users of two‐ or three‐wheeled motor  vehicles. 

D6.2 Policy Modelling and Simulation Tool  

42 | P a g e    

© Copyright 2015, Stockholm University, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences (DSV) 

‐ PPE employees / workers  ‐ PPE users / consumers 

Consistency with other policies and objectives: This initiative is in line with:  ‐ The Council Directive on the minimum health and safety requirements for the 

use by workers of personal protective equipment at the workplace  ‐ Commission’s policy on the Single Market  ‐ EC’s  policy  on  better  regulation  and  simplification  of  the  regulatory 

environment.  The New  Legislative  Framework  (NLF),  a  common  framework  for  the marketing  of  products. Its objectives in PPE sector include: (i) Reduce the amount of products on the  market of  low quality  (don’t ensure adequate  level of protection);  (ii) Accreditation,  market surveillance and controls of products from a third country; (iii) Unsatisfactory  performance  of  certain  notified  bodies;  and  (iv)  Inconsistencies  in  legislation  and  complexity of implementation for authorities and manufacturers.  EU action ‐ added value: 

‐ Approximation of the laws of the member states related to PPE.   ‐ Avoid distortions in the EU market 

Main Issues:   Extension of product coverage   Application of conformity assessment procedures   Changes in basic health and safety requirements (sufficient and clear)   More effective Market surveillance 

  Figure 15 presents a causal mapping model for the PPE use case policy problem. The  model shows the actors’ participation in a co‐decision legislative procedure. The model  shows two policy options, with the  legislative option more effective  in achieving the  policy objectives. Links are variably marked with positive and negative signs indicating  signs and intensity of the causal relationships.             

D6.2 Policy Modelling and Simulation Tool  

43 | P a g e    

© Copyright 2015, Stockholm University, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences (DSV) 

  Figure 15 : Causal map of the PPE use case 

“Get 15% discount on your first 3 orders with us”
Use the following coupon
FIRST15

Order Now